Monday, October 21, 2013

Psalm 45


Psalm 45:11-12, 14-15, 16-17

#439 Weekday Year II Context (Wednesday of the 23rd Week in Ordinary Time)

#529A Proper of Saints Context (St. Josephine Bakhita Feb 8)+

#599A Proper of Saints Context (St. Kateri Tekawitha Jul 14)+

#733 Commons Context (Common of Virgins, 1.)
R. (11) Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
or: R. (Matthew 25:6) The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.

#813 Ritual Mass Context (VIII. For the Consecration of Virgins and Religious Profession, 7.)
R. (Matthew 25:6) The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.

#854 Mass for Various Needs Context (I. For the Holy Church, 7. For Religious, 3.)
R. (11) Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
or: R. (Matthew 25:6) The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.

R. (11) Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

Hear, O daughter, and see; turn your ear,
forget your people and your father’s house.
So shall the king desire your beauty;
for he is your lord, and you must worship him.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

All glorious is the king’s daughter as she enters;
her raiment is threaded with spun gold.
In embroidered apparel she is borne in to the king;
behind her the virgins of her train are brought to you.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

They are borne in with gladness and joy;
they enter the palace of the king.
The place of your fathers your sons shall have;
you shall make them princes through all the land.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
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Commentary on Ps 45:11-12, 14-15, 16-17

Psalm 45 is a Royal Psalm originally sung in honor of the King’s marriage to a queen (of foreign extraction). It is likely that it influenced St. Paul’s instructions on virgins and marriage. It emphasizes the beauty of the sacramental relationship (see 1 Corinthians 7:25-35).

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Psalm 45:10, 11, 12, 16

#622 Proper of Saint Context (Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary [S] Aug 15)

R. (10bc) The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.

The queen takes her place at your right hand in gold of Ophir.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.

Hear, O daughter, and see; turn your ear,
forget your people and your father’s house.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.

So shall the king desire your beauty;
for he is your Lord.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.

They are borne in with gladness and joy;
they enter the palace of the king.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.
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Commentary on Ps 45:10, 11, 12, 16

Psalm 45 is a Royal Psalm, originally sung in honor of the King’s marriage to a queen (of foreign extraction). The queen identified in this passage is Jerusalem, central to the Jewish faith. Offered here, we see her (Jerusalem) as an analog to Mary who brought forth the Christ.

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Psalm 45:11-12, 14-15,16-17

#681 Proper of Saint Context (St. Cecilia Nov 22)

#709 Commons Context (Common of the Blessed Virgin Mary)

R. (11) Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
or:
R. The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.

Hear, O daughter, and see; turn your ear,
forget your people and your father's house.
So shall the king desire your beauty;
for he is your lord, and you must worship him.
R. Listen to me, daughter, see and bend your ear.
or:
R. The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.

All glorious is the king's daughter as she enters;
her raiment is threaded with spun gold.
In embroidered apparel she is borne in to the king;
behind her the virgins of her train are brought to you.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
or:
R. The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.

They are borne in with gladness and joy;
they enter the palace of the king.
The place of your fathers your sons shall have;
you shall make them princes through all the land.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
or:
R. The bridegroom is here; let us go out to meet Christ the Lord.
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Commentary on Ps 45:11-12, 14-15,16-17

Psalm 45 is a Royal Psalm originally sung in honor of the King’s marriage to a queen (of foreign extraction). Seen as an image of Christ as bridegroom and Church as bride, we see the love that seals that bond. The reference to the “virgins of her train” is seen as a reference to those who consecrate themselves to the Lord as religious or as consecrated virgins.

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Psalm 45:11-12, 14-15, 16-17, 18

#29O-1 BVM Context (The Blessed Virgin Mary, Queen of All Creation)

R. (11) Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

Hear, O daughter, and see; turn your ear,
forget your people and your father’s house.
So shall the king desire your beauty;
for he is your lord, and you must worship him.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

All glorious is the king’s daughter as she enters;
her raiment is threaded with spun gold.
In embroidered apparel she is borne in to the king;
behind her the virgins of her train are brought to you.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

They are borne in with gladness and joy;
they enter the palace of the king.
The place of your fathers your sons shall have;
you shall make them princes through all the land.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.

I will make your name renowned through all generations;
thus nations shall praise you forever.
R. Listen to me, daughter; see and bend your ear.
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Commentary on Ps 45:11-12, 14-15, 16-17, 18

Psalm 45 is a Royal Psalm originally sung in honor of the King’s marriage to a queen (of foreign extraction). It is likely that it influenced St. Paul’s instructions on virgins and marriage. It emphasizes the beauty of the sacramental relationship (see 1 Corinthians 7:25-35). The selection concludes with a final eternal praise for the Queen of Heaven.

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Fin
+ Added from the Sacramentary Supplement, provisional number assigned by SOW 

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